Covid-19 Calgary

RenoPros

COVID-19 Disinfect Solutions

Reno Pros is ready and equipped to disinfect any Home or Business relating to the COVID-19.

Corona-Virus
Covid-19 Calgary Home Cleaning

Residential COVID-19 Disinfect Solution

RenoPros is ready and equipped to disinfect and clean any small or large home relating to the COVID-19. The  service includes third party hygienist to complete the inspection after disinfecting and cleaning the area . Learn More about the Measures to mitigate the Coronavirus (Covid-19) at the workplace.

Business COVID-19 Disinfect Solution

RenoPros is ready and equipped to disinfect and clean any small or large workplace relating to the COVID-19. The  service includes third party hygienist to complete the inspection after disinfecting and cleaning the area . Learn More about the Measures to mitigate the Coronavirus (Covid-19) at the workplace.

Covid-19 Calgary Business Cleaning
Covid-19 Calgary Business Cleaning Corona Virus Solutions

How we can Help

Reno Pros is providing decontamination of hazardous materials (HAZMAT) including the recent threat of COVID-19 which poses a risk to employees and the public. We specialize in ensuring your workplace is returned to a safe and healthy space. As new discoveries are found daily, we have developed a hygienist approved up-to-date decontamination process. Our solution helps lower the risk of COVID-19 spreading in your work environment and limits your liability with 3rd party verification by well respected and recognised professionals.

If an individual who has come into contact with COVID-19 has been in your facility, we are trained and certified to ensure your workplace meets or exceeds Alberta’s occupational health and safety standards. The highly contagious nature of the virus and its ability to spread through multiple methods of travel requires all facilities to be disinfected thoroughly to help mitigate the spread of the virus.

Scope of Work

Pre-planning

Assessing given areas to be cleaned and further determine the level of risk. Establish work procedures to be followed and assemble the equipment required to perform the job. Place barriers and warning signs to be positioned in areas where access needs to be restricted until the work is completed. Where applicable, a two-stage decontamination unit with negative air should and will be used.

Equipment

DOP tested negative air units EPA and CEPA Approved disinfectants with Drug Identification Number (DIN).

All standard supplies such as spray bottle, hand pump sprayer, mops, rags, brushes, and much more. As required, we will be using certified Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Technicians performing the clean-up or removal will have a NIOSH approved respirator, disposable coveralls and boot covers, disposable nitrile or rubber gloves and eye protection. A higher level of protective equipment may be needed depending on the results of the hazard assessment. Our work procedures have been vigorously researched and tested to ensure we provide you with the most effective and up-to-date service.

RESOURCES

Vulnerable populations and COVID-19

How to isolate at home when you have COVID-19

Self isolate at home when you have COVID-19 [Alberta]

Reduce the spread of COVID-19: Wash your hands

How to care for a person with COVID-19 at home: Advice for caregivers

Know the difference : Self-monitoring, self-isolation, and isolation for COVID-19

About coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

Be Prepared COVID-19

Travellers returning from Iran, Italy and Hubei Province, China

Travellers returning to Canada

Know the facts about coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

A Pan-Canadian response to COVID-19

Physical distancing (Fact sheet)

Cleaning and disinfecting public spaces (COVID-19)

For travellers with symptoms returning to Canada

People who are at high risk for severe illness from COVID-19

How to care for a child with COVID-19 at home: Advice for caregivers

How to isolate at home when you have COVID-19

Preventing COVID-19 in the workplace: Employers, employees and essential service workers

How to quarantine (self-isolate) at home when you may have been exposed and have no symptoms

Taking Care of your Mental Health (COVID-19)

COVID-19 Standardized Protocol for All Canadian Construction Sites

Coronavirus Disease Questions - Answered

GET IN TOUCH

Need Help? Or Do You have Any Inquires?

  • info@renoproscovid19.com
  • 403-769-9330

GET IN TOUCH

Need Help? Or Do You have Any Inquires?

Get in touch

Need help? Or have any enquiry?

Covid-19 Calgary

Viral Disinfection Procedures: COVID-19 with Excerpts from Public Health Services.

Workprocedures

Workers doing the viral disinfection will receive our training on proper clean-up methods, personal protective equipment and potential health hazards before the work begins. They will all be “fit” tested for their masks. As per Public Health Canada, cleaning removes germs, dirt and impurities from surfaces or objects by using soap (or detergent) and water to physically remove germs from surfaces. This process does not necessarily kill germs, but by removing them, it lowers their numbers and risk of spreading infection. Disinfection kills germs on surfaces or objects using chemicals. This process does not necessarily clean dirty surfaces or remove germs, but by killing germs on a surface after cleaning, it can further lower the risk of spreading infection. For effective disinfection, cleaning should be done first. The work area should be unoccupied. People from spaces beside the work area may not need to be moved unless they fall in the sensitive or very sensitive population category. Areas to be cleaned via wiping procedures will include areas such as: doorknobs, light switches, staff rooms, desktops, washrooms, and other high touch surfaces. Materials to be cleaned through misting (not soaked) with the chosen disinfectant will be misted with chosen apparatus in a short sweeping motions to avoid product damage. Product should be in contact surface for several minutes for disinfection to occur. The work area and decontamination areas used by workers to enter the area will be kept clean and thoroughly misted ceiling to floor, prior to workers leaving the areas.
Covid-19 Calgary

Viral Disinfection Procedures: COVID-19 with Excerpts from Public Health Services.

Cleaning

Cleaning of fixed building materials will be completed for nonporous
materials, Cleaning of semi-porous materials (such as
wood and plaster). Porous materials that are not fixed in place
such as curtains and fabrics may be laundered or sprayed if
necessary.

Covid-19 Calgary

Viral Disinfection Procedures: COVID-19 with Excerpts from Public Health Services.

Waste Handling

Contaminated cleaning materials such as cloths and wipes,
including polyethylene sheeting clothes and used protective
equipment will be double-bagged in 6-mil polyethylene bags and
sealed immediately.

Covid-19 Calgary

Viral Disinfection Procedures: COVID-19 with Excerpts from Public Health Services.

Decontamination Procedures

Washing facilities will be available to workers. Workers will
remove and dispose of their used protective clothing and wash
their hands and face before leaving the work area and before
eating, drinking.

Covid-19 Calgary

Viral Disinfection Procedures: COVID-19 with Excerpts from Public Health Services.

Site Inspection

Daily inspections will be completed to ensure proper disinfectant
has been selected, containment (if applicable) is sealed with a
negative air unit in use, worker PPE is on site and in proper
condition.

Once the work is done, the work area will be inspected to ensure
that the potentially contaminated materials have been properly
cleaned. The work area will be left dry and free of debris. Upon
successful completion of the cleaning process a full report will be
made available to the client detailing daily activity and a final
clearance report signed, approved and provided by the thirdparty
hygienist.

Stay informed and communicate: It is vital that employers stay
informed about the status of COVID-19 and keep employees
informed as well as COVID-19 continues to develop in order to
best manage the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace. Employers
should also remind employees about policies in place regarding
sick leave, paid time off, and working from home and
communicate any new policies or measures taken to deal with
COVID-19 to employees. Finally, there is a lot of misinformation
about COVID-19 in the news and media. It is important that
employers refer to and provide employees with accurate and
reliable information.

Covid-19 Calgary

Measures to mitigate the spread of coronavirus(COVID-19) at home

AT YOUR HOME

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), in collaboration with Canadian public health experts has developed the guidance for federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) public health authorities (PHA) on the use of public health measures (PHM) to reduce and delay transmission of COVID-19 in the community.

PUBLIC HEALTH MEASURES
Public health measures (PHM) include non-pharmaceutical interventions that can be used to reduce and delay community transmission of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Implemented early, PHM seeks to reduce the speed with which cases are occurring to delay and to reduce the peak of virus activity in the community and reduce the demand for health care services. Some measures are used commonly in Canada for seasonal influenza and other communicable disease outbreaks, while others will likely only be considered during a more severe pandemic. Given that there is currently no effective vaccine or specific treatment (e.g. antiviral medication) for COVID-19, public health measures will be the only tools available to mitigate the impact of the virus. A crucial aspect of PHM is effective communications by PHA to promote and support public trust.

BASIC MEASURES
Public Health Measures such as hand hygiene, respiratory etiquette, and environmental cleaning in the home are the cornerstone public measures to protect individuals, their families and others against seasonal influenza and other respiratory viruses. The same measures are also effective when COVID-19 is circulating in the community. The application of these principles will help prevent and control the transmission of any respiratory infectious disease including COVID-19

ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANING AND VENTILATION
Environmental Cleaning refers to the routine cleaning of frequently used surfaces and objects to help to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 and to help to mitigate the risk of people becoming infected through self-inoculation after touching contaminated surfaces. The virus that causes COVID-19 has the potential to survive in the environment for up to several days. Cleaning, particularly of frequently touched surfaces, can kill the virus, making it no longer possible to infect people.

  • Cleaning the home and co-living setting: Citizens can play an imperative role to tackle the spread of Coronavirus. There are actions which we all can take to fight for a world with good health for all. To begin with, frequently touched areas such as toilets, bedside tables, light switches, and door handles should be first cleaned (to physically remove dirt) and disinfected daily with water and regular household cleaning products or a diluted bleach solution (0.5% sodium hypochlorite). If they can withstand the use of liquids for disinfection, frequently touched electronics such as phones, computers, and other devices may be disinfected with 70% alcohol (e.g. alcohol prep wipes). All used disposable contaminated items should be placed in a lined container before disposing of them with other household waste.
  • Cleaning public spaces: Cleaning of high traffic public spaces (e.g. malls, airports, public transportation) should follow a regular cleaning and disinfecting regime, both in terms of products used and surfaces targeted, as it is not likely practical/sustainable to increase the frequency of cleaning. Community settings are encouraged to develop protocols for cleaning public spaces if they currently do not have an established cleaning routine. Workplaces and other similar community settings are encouraged to clean highly touched surfaces (e.g. phones, elevator buttons, washrooms, tables) frequently and to recommend and facilitate increased hand hygiene. It is also recommended that items that cannot be easily cleaned (e.g., newspapers, magazines, stuffed toys) be removed.

HAND HYGIENE
Refers to handwashing with soap and water or hand sanitizing with alcoholic solutions, gels or tissues to maintain clean hands and fingernails. It should be performed frequently with soap and water for at least 15-20 seconds:

  • Before and after preparing food;
  • Before and after eating;
  • After using the toilet;
  • After coughing/sneezing into a tissue (or if non-compliant with respiratory etiquette);
  • Before and after using a surgical/procedure mask and after removing gloves;
  • After handling body fluid-contaminated waste or laundry;
  • Whenever hands look dirty.

If soap and water are not available, hands can be cleaned with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer (ABHS) that contains at least 60% alcohol, ensuring that all surfaces of the hands are covered (e.g. front and back of hands as well as between fingers) and rubbed together until they feel dry. For visibly soiled hands, soiling should be removed with an alcohol-based hand wipe first, followed by the use of ABHS.
Touching one’s eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands should be avoided.

RESPIRATORY ETIQUETTE
Describes a combination of measures intended to minimize the dispersion of large-particle respiratory droplets when an ill person is coughing, sneezing and talking to reduce virus transmission.

  • over coughs and sneezes with a surgical/procedure mask or tissue. Dispose of tissues in a lined waste container and perform hand hygiene immediately after a cough or sneeze OR
  • Cough/sneeze into the bend of your arm, not your hand

ISOLATION
Isolation is recommended for an asymptomatic individual that is suspected of having, or known to have, COVID-19. They are directed by PHA to isolate themselves in the home-setting and avoid contact with others until PHA has advised that they are no longer considered contagious. Isolation includes:

  • Not going out of the home setting. This includes school, work, or other public areas
  • Not using public transportation (e.g. buses, subways, taxis)
  • Identifying a “buddy” to check on and do errands for each other, especially for those who live alone or at high risk for developing complications.
  • Having supplies delivered home instead of running errands (supplies should be left on the front door or at least a 2-meter distance maintained between people)
  • If leaving the home setting cannot be avoided (e.g. to go to a medical appointment), wear a mask (if not available, cover mouth and nose with tissues) and maintain a 2-meter distance from others. The health care facility should be informed in advance that the person may be infectious.
  • Voluntary home quarantine (“self-isolation”) is recommended for an asymptomatic person, when they have a high risk of exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19 which include close contact with an asymptomatic person or their body fluids

SELF-MONITORING
Self-monitoring is implemented when individuals are potentially exposed to the virus and include monitoring for the occurrence of symptoms compatible with COVID-19. If symptoms develop, the individual should follow the recommended public health actions regarding convalescing at home versus seeking medical care, depending on the severity of symptoms and the presence of underlying medical conditions.

USE OF MASKS
Masks should be used by asymptomatic individuals, if available, to provide a physical barrier that may help to prevent the transmission of the virus by blocking the dispersion of large-particle respiratory droplets propelled by coughing, sneezing and talking. A face mask should always be combined with other measures such as respiratory etiquette and hand hygiene. They can be worn by people suspected or confirmed of having COVID-19 when in close contact with other people in the home-setting or if they must leave the home-setting for medical attention. The use of a mask by a healthy person who is providing direct care for a person with COVID-19 should always be combined with eye protection and gloves and other droplet/contact prevention measures including hand hygiene and environmental cleaning.

Covid-19 Calgary

Measures to mitigate the spread of coronavirus(COVID-19) at workplace

AT YOUR WORKPLACE

The spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has been the dominating news topic of 2020 so far.It affects every place where the workplace is not an exception.With the global spread of the novel coronavirus(COVID-19),it is important for employers to be prepared to respond.
All business environments need to be safe and hygienic for employees as well as the visitors.There must be some solid policies to ensure that proper hygiene is maintained at the workplace.
In order to keep the workplace safe ,employees must be encouraged to:

Practice good hygiene:
Stop handshaking-Prevent handshaking and use some other methods of greeting.Clean hands most often and schedule regular hand washing reminders by email.Avoid touching the disinfected surfaces like doorknobs,tables,desks and handrails regularly .Increase ventilation by opening windows or by adjusting air conditioning.

Be careful with meetings and travel:
Use videoconferencing for meetings and if couldn’t then hold meetings in open and well ventilated spaces.If possible consider adjusting or postponing large meetings.

Handle food carefully:
In order to minimize the chances of you being affected by the COVID-19virus,Limit the food sharing because COVID-19 is a respiratory virus,and we know that people who have symptoms can certainly transmit the infection to close contacts.Before buying the food ensure that the cafeteria staff practice strict hygiene.Strengthen health screening for cafeteria staff and their close contacts.

Stay home if:
Prefer to stay home if you are feeling sick or even if you have any family member who is sick.

  • Some strategies that workplace can put into effect include:
  • Increased awareness about and communication to staff about COVID-19.
  • Evaluate the workplace for areas where people have frequent contact with each other and share spaces and objects.
  • Although not conclusive, there may be benefit to increasing the spatial separation between desks and workstations as well as individuals (e.g., employees, customers) from each other, ideally a 2 metre separation should be maintained, unless there is a physical barrier (e.g., cubicle, Plexiglas window).
  • Workplaces and other similar community settings are encouraged to increase frequency of cleaning of frequently touched surfaces (e.g., phones, elevator buttons, computers, desks, lunch tables, kitchens, washrooms, cash registers, seating areas, surface counters, customer service counters, bars, restaurant tables/menus).
  • Provide access to handwashing facilities and place hand sanitizing dispensers in prominent locations throughout the workplace, if possible.
  • Consider providing additional tissues should someone develop respiratory symptoms. If symptoms develop the person should immediately be separated from others, instructed on respiratory etiquette and sent home (not using public transit, if possible).
  • Where feasible, adjustments to policies and procedures may be put in place to reduce social contact, such as teleworking arrangements, flexible hours, staggering start times, use of email and teleconferencing.
  • For business travel, employers should be aware of the latest information on COVID-19 affected areas and any travel health advisories. The risks and benefits related to upcoming business travel should be assessed and consideration given to alternative approaches such as virtually attending meetings. International business travellers returning from affected areas should self-monitor for symptoms and follow advice to provide PHAs regarding the recommended actions.
  • Consider relaxing sick leave policies that support employees in self-isolating when ill. This includes suspending the need for medical notes to return to work (reduces the burden on an already stressed health care system).
  • Employers should prepare for increases in absenteeism due to illness among employees and their families or possibly school closures. Employers should access their business continuity plans, which should include a plan for how to maintain key business functions if faced with high absenteeism. Consideration should also be given to the need for cross-training personnel to function in key positions. This is an important element of Business Continuity Planning.
  • Workplace and community setting closures may be considered, based on local conditions and a risk assessment in an exceptional circumstance, such as if COVID-19 evolves into one with high severity and if many employees must be off to prevent transmission. The selection of measures will depend on the company and the type of work; some measures (e.g. cancellation or closures) may have significant economic consequences and decisions made based on a risk-benefit analysis.
  • Stay informed and communicate:It is vital that employers stay informed about the status of COVID-19 and keep employees informed as well as COVID-19 continues to develop in order to best manage the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace. Employers should also remind employees about policies in place regarding sick leave, paid time off, and working from home and communicate any new policies or measures taken to deal with COVID-19 to employees. Finally, there is a lot of misinformation about COVID-19 in the news and media. It is important that employers refer to and provide employees with accurate and reliable information.